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100 tablets

About B Complex tablets

Food supplement with all 8 B vitamins.

About B Complex tablets

Food supplement with all 8 B vitamins.

Niacin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamins B6, B12 and folate (folic acid) contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue.

 

Thiamine (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamins B6, B12, biotin and niacin contribute to the normal functioning of the nervous system.

The package contains 100 tablets.

Posology and intended use

B Complex tablets help to maintain a healthy nervous system. Use to reduce tiredness and fatigue.

Posology and intended use

B Complex tablets help to maintain a healthy nervous system.

Use to reduce tiredness and fatigue.

Use in case of vitamin B deficiency and irregular or unvaried diet.

Intended for vegetarians and people exposed to stress.

Instructions for use

Take 1 tablet a day after a meal.

Vitamin B complex

Vitamin B complex is a set of eight water-soluble vitamins: B1, B2, B3, B6, folic acid, B12, pantothenic acid and biotin. B vitamins are quickly excreted through the urine so it is necessary to ensure sufficient daily intake of B vitamins either through diet or food supplements.

 

Each vitamin B has a specific function, but they are all responsible for producing energy from carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

 

B vitamins work closely together to maintain the metabolism and the immune and nervous systems in a healthy condition. They also contribute to normal psychological function, healthy skin, hair and mucous membranes, and have many other beneficial effects on the body.

Niacin

Niacin contributes to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue.

 

Niacin is extremely important for energy production from glucose as it is used in the glycolytic or phosphogluconate pathway for glucose breakdown. Therefore, if there is no niacin, the cells are left without energy. Sources of niacin include diary products, eggs, poultry, legumes and nuts.

Pantothenic acid

Pantothenic acid contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism.

 

It is a component of coenzyme A, involved in a number of enzymatic reactions, and is particularly important in the initial processes of the Krebs cycle where energy is produced from glucose.

 

Rich sources of pantothenic acid include meat, legumes, eggs, fruits and vegetables.

 

Riboflavin

Riboflavin contributes to the maintenance of normal mucous membranes and normal skin.

 

Riboflavin is involved in energy production from carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

 

Hypovitaminosis is a rarely diagnosed condition caused by insufficient food intake.

The most common symptom is skin cracking at the corners of the mouth. Rich sources of riboflavin include dairy products, broccoli, spinach, legumes, eggs and nuts.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 contributes to normal protein and glycogen metabolism. It also contributes to the normal functioning of the nervous and immune systems.

 

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is found in plant and animal tissues, especially in the liver and kidneys, as well as in dry fruits, bananas, spinach, yeast, fish, soybeans, eggs, milk… You could say it’s omnipresent. Vitamin B6 deficiency is very rare. It occurs in diets rich in additives, particularly glutamate. Food processing can significantly reduce the amount of vitamin B6.

Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

Thiamine contributes to normal psychological function and to normal functioning of the nervous system.

 

Thiamine pyrophosphate, the active form of thiamine, is a cofactor of several enzymes involved in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids, and it also plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism.

 

Thiamine is involved in the transmission of nerve impulses throughout the body. Rich sources of vitamin B1 include liver, heart, kidneys, eggs, green leafy vegetables, walnuts, legumes, berries, wheat germ. It is also found in most unprocessed grains. More than 50% of thiamine in raw food will be lost after cooking. The biological value of thiamine can be reduced by food enzymes such as thiaminase (raw fish and shellfish) or by anti-thiamine factors found in coffee and tea.

Folic acid

Folate contributes to normal amino acid synthesis and blood formation.

 

Folic acid supports maternal tissue growth during pregnancy; therefore it is especially important in the period of accelerated cell division and growth, like that of childhood and pregnancy.

 

Absorption occurs in the duodenal mucosa with the help of enzymes as a result of metabolic changes and the formation of active forms.

Main dietary sources include primarily green leafy vegetables, followed by legumes, citrus fruits, whole grains and meat.

Biotin

Biotin was originally called vitamin H after the German word haut which means skin. Biotin is found in egg yolk, meat, beans and fish, but in most foods it is not bioavailable. It is synthesized in the digestive tract by intestinal bacteria.

 

Biotin is a key component of enzymes in the body and is essential for metabolic functions of gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid biosynthesis.

 

Biotin contributes to the maintenance of normal hair, skin and mucous membranes.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 has various metabolic functions. Vitamin B12 contributes to the normal formation of red blood cells and plays a role in the process of cell division. Vitamin B12 contributes to the normal functioning of the immune and nervous systems.

 

It is the only vitamin synthesized exclusively by microorganisms. Unlike other B vitamins, it is not found in vegetables, even though it can be synthesized by bacteria in plant roots. Sources of vitamin B12 include seafood, fish, egg yolk, milk and cheese. The loss of vitamin B12 during cooking is minimal. Although vitamin B12 deficiency is rare, it is common in vegetarians who don’t eat fish or dairy products.

Contains: The recommended daily dose
1 tablet % NRV*
Niacin (nicotinamide) 16 mg NE 100
 Pantothenic acid (calcium D-pantothenate) 6 mg 100
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 1,4 mg 100
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride) 1,4 mg 100
 Thiamine (thiamine mononitrate) 1,1 mg 100
Folic acid (pteroylmonoglutamic acid) 200 μg 100
 Biotin (D-biotin) 50 μg 100
Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) 2,5 μg 100

* NRV = nutrient reference value


Ingredients:
bulking agents: dicalcium phosphate and microcrystalline cellulose; nicotinamide; calcium D-pantothenate; maltodextrin; D-biotin; pteroylmonoglutamic acid; stabiliser: polyvinylpyrrolidone; cyanocobalamin; pyridoxine hydrochloride; riboflavin; thiamine mononitrate; anti-caking agents: magnesium salts of fatty acids and silicon dioxide.

Vitamin B complex

Vitamin B complex is a set of eight water-soluble vitamins: B1, B2, B3, B6, folic acid, B12, pantothenic acid and biotin.

Read more

Niacin

Niacin contributes to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue.

Read more

Pantothenic acid

Pantothenic acid contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism. Rich sources of pantothenic acid include meat, legumes, eggs, fruits and vegetables.

Read more

Riboflavin

Riboflavin contributes to the maintenance of normal mucous membranes and normal skin. Rich sources of riboflavin include dairy products, broccoli, spinach, legumes, eggs and nuts.

Read more

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 contributes to normal protein and glycogen metabolism. It also contributes to the normal functioning of the nervous and immune systems.

Read more

Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

Thiamine contributes to normal psychological function and to normal functioning of the nervous system.

Read more

Folic acid

Folate contributes to normal amino acid synthesis and blood formation.

Read more

Biotin

Biotin was originally called vitamin H after the German word haut which means skin. Biotin contributes to the maintenance of normal hair, skin and mucous membranes.

Read more

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 contributes to the normal formation of red blood cells and plays a role in the process of cell division. Vitamin B12 contributes to the normal functioning of the immune and nervous systems.

Read more